Ellis-Pagoria Family History
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William Howell Beal
Male 1836 - 1918

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  • Birth  18 Sep 1836  Canandaigua, Ontario Co., New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    Buried  1918  Oak Hill Cemetery/Hammond, Lake, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died  14 May 1918  Thornton, Cook, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID  I1210  Ellis-Pagoria Family Tree
    Last Modified  23 Dec 2012 
     
    Father  Israel Clark Beal,   b. 19 Jun 1809, Junius, Seneca County, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Sep 1850, Brunswick, Medina County, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Temperence Howell,   b. 1810, Junius, Seneca County, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 09 Dec 1874, Sandusky, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  Jun 1831  Junius, Seneca, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID  F496  Group Sheet
     
    Family  Maria Elizabeth Yount,   b. 30 Oct 1839, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Mar 1910, Burnham, Thornton Township, Cook County, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  01 Dec 1857  Hull Prairie, Wood, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Lillian Inez Beal,   b. 26 Aug 1858, Middleton, Wood, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Dec 1934, Chicago, Cook, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Zelma Elizabeth Beal,   b. 20 Dec 1860
     3. George William Beal,   b. 23 Sep 1862
     4. Maria Gwendolen Beal,   b. 1867, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1894
     5. Jessie Amber Beal,   b. 20 Oct 1869, Monclova, Lucas, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Feb 1927, Cass City, Tuscola, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. Sophronia Beal,   b. 03 Feb 1872,   d. 19 Sep 1906
     7. William Constantine Beal,   b. 23 Feb 1876, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     8. Alasio Beal
     9. Elizabeth Beal
    Family ID  F488  Group Sheet
     
  • Photos 1870 Census - Temperance (Howell) Beal & Family.jpg
    William Howell Beal (1836-1918) Headstone 2.jpg
    1850 Census - Israel, Temperance Beal.jpg
    William Howell Beal (1836-1918) Headstone.jpg
    1880 Census - William & Maria Yount Beal & Family.jpg
    William Howell Beal (1836-1918) with Survivors.jpg
    1900 Census - William & Maria Yount Beal.jpg
    Home for Aged Soldiers -1917.jpg
    111th Ohio Reunion Photo.jpg
    1860 Census - William & Maria Yount Beal.jpg
    111th Ohio Infantry Flag - Captain William H. Beale.jpg
    1870 Census - William & Maria Yount Beal & Family.jpg
    1910 Census - William H. Beal & Lillian Inez Beal.jpg
     
  • Notes 
    • Audrey Maxine Ellis' Great Grandfather

      William H. Beal was born in 1836 in New York. His family moved to Ohio, where William first enlisted in Company H of the 14th Ohio Infantry as a private for a three month term from April 22 or 25 to August 13, 1861, when the unit mustered out. He then enlisted on July 25, 1862 as a 2nd Lt. in Company B of the 111th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and later, moving to Company A of that unit, was promoted to a 1st Lt., and then a Captain in 1863. The 111th saw much action in the Atlanta campaign, the Battle of Franklin, and in Tennessee. About 2/3's of the regiment's more than 1,000 soldiers were killed in action, discharged on disability, or died as a result of wounds or disease. Beal mustered out with his company in June of 1865, in Salibury, N.C. His commanding officer, Isaac R. Sherwood, would later become Ohio Secretary of State and also serve in Congress. Beal praised Sherwood in a letter to the editor of the National Tribune, the GAR newspaper, in its June 5, 1884, issue. Beal was a carpenter by trade. Sometime between 1872 and 1876, William and his wife, Maria (h), and their family moved from northern Ohio to Michigan. William and his wife moved to Chicago prior to 1894. The 1900 census lists his occupation as a lamplighter. Apparently they were living in Burnham, Illinois, where Maria died in 1910. Health issues led to William's admission to the National Soldiers Home in Danville, Illinois in 1917. W.H. Beal's death certificate shows he died at Illinois Central Hospital, although his obituary in the Lake County Times on May 15, 1918, says he died at his home in Hegewisch, where the funeral was to take place in the Methodist Church. Beal was buried at Oak Hill Cemetery in Hammond, as was his wife eight years earlier.

      Research provided by Linda Herrick Swisher, public information coordinator, Hammond Public Library.

      Captain William Howell Beal carried with him a bible all through the Civil War. This same bible was carried through the First World War by Earl Spencer, son of Jacob William & Jessie Beal Spencer, who was assigned to the 338th field artillary unit which was later taken into the 15th Engineers unit, until he was discharged in June of 1919. This same bible was carried through the Second World War by Mason Spencer, son of Earl Spencer.

      Name: William Beal
      Enlistment Date: 19 Jul 1862
      Side Served: Union
      State Served: Ohio
      Service Record: Enlisted as a 1st Lieutenant on 19 July 1862 at the age of 24.
      Commission in Company A, 111th Infantry Regiment Ohio on 19 Jul 1862.
      Promoted to Full Captain (As of Co. B) on 13 Mar 1863.
      Mustered Out Company A, 111th Infantry Regiment Ohio on 27 Jun 1865 at Salisbury, NC.

      Sources: 17

      111th Infantry Regiment Ohio
      Date of Organization: 6 Sep 1862
      Muster Date: 27 Jun 1865
      Regiment State: Ohio
      Regiment Type: Infantry
      Regiment Number: 111th
      Officers Killed or Mortally Wounded: 2
      Officers Died of Disease or Accident: 3
      Enlisted Killed or Mortally Wounded: 52
      Enlisted Died of Disease or Accident: 158
      Regimental Soldiers and History: List of Soldiers

      Regimental History
      OHIO
      ONE HUNDRED and ELEVENTH INFANTRY
      (Three Years)

      One Hundred and Eleventh Infantry. - Col., John R. Bond;
      Lieut.Cols., Benjamin W. Johnson, Moses R. Brailey, Isaac R.
      Sherwood; Maj. Thomas C. Norris. This regiment was organized
      at Camp Toledo, Sept. 5 and 6, 1862, to serve for three years.
      It was a northwestern Ohio regiment, having been raised in San-
      dusky, Lucas, Wood, Fulton, Williams and Defiance counties. It
      took the field at Covington, Ky., and remained in that state
      employed in various duties for the greater part of a year. It
      was then ordered to East Tennessee, where it was first engaged
      at Huff's ferry, losing only a few wounded, as it was on the
      right flank of the brigade and partially under cover of dense
      woods. At Loudon creek a brisk skirmish took place between the
      regiment and the 6th S. C. sharpshooters, composing Gen. Long-
      street's advance, and in this engagement the regiment lost 4
      killed and 12 wounded. In the engagement at Campbell's station
      the regiment occupied the front line, directly in front of two
      batteries of Confederate artillery, and was for 6 hours exposed
      to the shells of the enemy's concentrated fire, but lost only 8
      men killed and wounded. It passed through the siege of Knox-
      ville, occupying the fort on College hill, and lost 6 men
      killed and wounded. After Gen. Longstreet's retreat it took
      part in the skirmishes at Blain's cross-roads and Dandridge and
      occupied an outpost 6 miles in front of the city when Gen.
      Schofield fell back the second time on Knoxville. In May the
      regiment united with the left wing of Gen. Sherman's army to
      participate in the Atlanta campaign. It marched to Tunnel Hill
      on May 7, and on the following day skirmished into a position
      in front of Buzzard Roost gap. It had but seven companies en-
      gaged at Resaca, but out of the number 7 men were killed and 30
      wounded. In the engagement at Dallas it lost 15 men killed and
      wounded. It was actively engaged in the siege of Kennesaw
      mountain, the battles at Pine and Lost mountains, on the Chat-
      tahoochee river, near Nickajack creek, at Peachtree creek, in
      the siege of Atlanta and the skirmishes at Utoy creek and Love-
      joy's Station. It started on the Atlanta campaign with 380 men
      and of this number lost in killed and wounded 212. Following
      Hood into Tennessee, it participated in the skirmishes at Co-
      lumbia and was detailed to remain in the rear to guard the
      forks of Duck river while Gen. Thomas' army fell back on Frank-
      lin. In the fight at Franklin, out of 180 men engaged the
      regiment lost 22 men killed on the field and 40 wounded, many
      being killed by Confederate bayonets. It was severely engaged
      during both days of the fighting in front of Nashville and in a
      charge on the second day it captured 3 Confederate battle-flags
      and a large number of prisoners, losing 7 killed and 15 wound-
      ed. After pursuing Hood for some distance, the regiment was
      sent to North Carolina, where it joined the army under Gen.
      Terry and took an active part in the capture of Fort Anderson
      and in the skirmishes at Town creek and Goldsboro. It then did
      garrison duty at Salisbury until ordered home to be mustered
      out, the latter event occurring on June 27, 1865. The regiment
      numbered 1,050 when it entered the service and received 85 re-
      cruits. Of these men 234 were discharged for disability, dis-
      ease and wounds; 200 died of disease contracted in the service;
      252 were killed in battle or died of wounds and 401 were mus-
      tered out, leaving 48 unaccounted for.

      Source: The Union Army, vol. 2

      Battles Fought
      Fought on 2 Jan 1863 at Stones River, TN.
      Fought on 14 Feb 1863.
      Fought on 14 Nov 1863 at Huff's Ferry, TN.
      Fought on 15 Nov 1863 at Loudon Creek, TN.
      Fought on 16 Nov 1863 at Lenoir, TN.
      Fought on 16 Nov 1863 at Campbell's Station, TN.
      Fought on 20 Nov 1863.
      Fought on 21 Jan 1864 at Strawberry Plains, TN.
      Fought on 22 Jan 1864 at Knoxville, TN.
      Fought on 9 May 1864 at Rocky Face Ridge, GA.
      Fought on 14 May 1864 at Resaca, GA.
      Fought on 27 May 1864 at Dallas, GA.
      Fought on 2 Jun 1864 at Mud Creek, GA.
      Fought on 2 Jun 1864 at Dallas, GA.
      Fought on 22 Jun 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA.
      Fought on 27 Jun 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA.
      Fought on 28 Jun 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA.
      Fought on 2 Jul 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA.
      Fought on 20 Jul 1864 at Atlanta, GA.
      Fought on 22 Jul 1864 at Atlanta, GA.
      Fought on 24 Jul 1864 at Atlanta, GA.
      Fought on 29 Jul 1864 at Atlanta, GA.
      Fought on 6 Aug 1864 at Atlanta, GA.
      Fought on 5 Sep 1864 at Lovejoy Station, GA.
      Fought on 30 Sep 1864 at Stone Mountain, GA.
      Fought on 28 Nov 1864 at Columbia, TN.
      Fought on 29 Nov 1864 at On Retreat From Columbia, TN.
      Fought on 29 Nov 1864.
      Fought on 30 Nov 1864 at Franklin, TN.
      Fought on 15 Dec 1864 at Nashville, TN.
      Fought on 16 Dec 1864 at Nashville, TN.