Ellis-Pagoria Family History
You are currently anonymous Log In
 

 Notes


HomeHome    SearchSearch    PrintPrint    Login - User: anonymousLogin    Add BookmarkAdd Bookmark

Matches 12001 to 12020 of 12020

      «Prev «1 ... 237 238 239 240 241

   Notes   Linked to 
12001 Audrey Maxine Ellis' 72nd Great Grand Uncle

Zebulun (also Zebulon, Zabulon or Zaboules,[1] Standard Hebrew Zvulun, commonly Zvulun in Israel) was, according to the Books of Genesis and Numbers,[2][3] the sixth son of Jacob and Leah, and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Zebulun. Some Biblical scholars believe this to be an eponymous metaphor providing an aetiology of the connectedness of the tribe to others in the Israelite confederation.[4] With Leah as a matriarch, Biblical scholars believe the tribe to have been regarded by the text's authors as a part of the original Israelite confederation.[5]

The name is derived from the Northwest Semitic root zbl, common in 2nd millennium BC Ugaritic texts as an epithet (title) of the god Baal, as well as in Phoenician and (frequently) in biblical Hebrew in personal names.[6]

The text of the Torah gives two different etymologies for the name Zebulun, which textual scholars attribute to different sources - one to the Yahwist and the other to the Elohist;[7] the first being that it derives from zebed, the word for gift, in reference to Leah's view that her gaining of six sons was a gift from God; the second being that it derives from yizbeleni, meaning honour, in reference to Leah's hope that Jacob would give her honour now that she had given birth to six sons. In Deuteronomy, however an allusion is made to a third potential etymology[8] - that it may be connected with zibhe, literally meaning sacrifice, in reference to commercial activities of the tribe of Zebulun[9] - a commercial agreement made at Mount Tabor between the tribe of Zebulun and a group of non-Israelites was referred to as zibhe-tzedek, literally meaning sacrifice to justice or sacrifice to Tzedek.[9]

The Torah states that Zebulun had three sons - Sered, Elon, and Jahleel - each the eponymous founder of a clan. Beyond this, there is little other reference to Zebulun.

The Tomb of Zebulun is located in Sidon, Lebanon. In the past, towards the end of Iyyar, Jews from the most distant parts of Palestine would make a pilgrimage to this tomb.

Some believe the depopulated village of Sabalan in the District of Safad was named after Zebulun.

References

1. in Antiquities of the Jews by Josephus
2. Genesis 46:14
3. Numbers 26:26
4. Peake's commentary on the Bible
5. Jewish Encyclopedia, Tribe of Zebulun
6. "Precarious Scholarship: Problems with Proposing that the Seal of Yzbl was Queen Jezebel's", Christopher A. Rollston, BASOR 2007. The article concerns a seal ascribed to Jezebel; the first paragraph gives an overview of the root /zbl/, which Jezebel shares with Zebulun.
7. Richard Elliott Friedman, Who wrote the Bible
8. Deuteronomy 33:19
9. Jewish Encyclopedia

WikipediaŽ is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
 
Zebulin
 
12002 In the Book of Genesis, Zilpah ("Drooping", Standard Hebrew Zilpa, Tiberian Hebrew Zilpah) is Leah's handmaid who becomes a wife of Jacob and bears him two sons Gad and Asher.[1]

Zilpah is given to Leah as a handmaid by Leah's father, Laban, upon Leah's marriage to Jacob (see Genesis 29:24, 46:18). According to some commentators, Zilpah and Bilhah, the handmaids of Leah and Rachel, respectively, were actually younger daughters of Laban {Pirke De-Rabbi Eliezer, xxxvi.}.

According to Rashi, an 11th century commentator, Zilpah was younger than Bilhah, and Laban's decision to give her to Leah was part of the deception he used to trick Jacob into marrying Leah, who was older than Rachel. The morning after the wedding, Laban explained to Jacob, "This is not done in our place, to give the younger before the older" (Genesis 29:26). But at night, to mask the deception, Laban gave the veiled bride the younger of the handmaids, so Jacob would think that he was really marrying Rachel, the younger of the sisters.

Zilpah also figures in the competition between Jacob's wives to bear him sons. Leah stops conceiving after the birth of her fourth son, at which point [2] Rachel, who had not yet borne children, offers her handmaid, Bilhah, in marriage to Jacob so that she can have children through her. When Bilhah conceives two sons, Leah takes up the same idea and presents Zilpah as a wife to Jacob. Leah names the two sons of Zilpah and is directly involved in their upbringing.

In Jewish tradition, Zilpah is believed to be buried in the Tomb of the Matriarchs in Tiberias.

Popular culture

In the novel The Red Tent by Anita Diamant, Zilpah and Bilhah are represented as half-sisters of Leah and Rachel by different mothers.

References

1. Genesis 30:9
2. Genesis 30:3

WikipediaŽ is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
 
Zilpah
 
12003 "New York Passenger List". Database and images. The National Archives. Source: "New York Passenger List"
 
12004 "Passport Application". Database and images. The National Archives. Source: "Passport Application"
 
12005 "Social Security Death Index". The National Archives. Source: "Social Security Death Index"
 
12006 "World War I Draft Registration Cards 1917-1918". Database and images. The National Archives. Source: "World War I Draft Registration Cards 1917-1918"
 
12007 "World War II Draft Registration Cards 1942". Database and images. The National Archives. Source: "World War II Draft Registration Cards 1942"
 
12008 1880 U.S. census. 10th U. S. Census schedule. Illinois. Cook. Digital images. Source: 1880 U.S. Census, Illinois, Cook, Bloom, 10th U. S. Census Schedule; Online Images
 
12009 Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Source: 1880 United States Federal Census
 
12010 1900 U.S. census. 12th Census schedule. Illinois. Cook. Digital images. Source: 1900 U.S. Census, Illinois, Cook, Bloom , 12th Census Schedule; Online Images
 
12011 United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900 Source: 1900 United States Federal Census
 
12012 1910 U.S. census. 13th Census schedule. Illinois. Cook. Digital images. Source: 1910 U.S. Census, Illinois, Cook, Thornton Township, 13th Census Schedule; Online Images
 
12013 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: 1920 U.S. Census, Illinois, Cook, 14th Census Schedule; Online Images
 
12014 1920 U.S. census. Illinois. Cook. Digital images. Source: 1920 U.S. Census, Illinois, Cook, Bloom; Online Images
 
12015 1920 U.S. census. 14th Census schedule. Illinois. Cook. Digital images. Source: 1920 U.S. Census, Illinois, Cook, Thornton, 14th Census Schedule; Online Images
 
12016 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: 1930 U.S. Census, Illinois, Cook, Bloom Township, 15th Census Schedule; Online Images
 
12017 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: Ancestry Family Trees
 
12018 Maine Birth Records, 1621-1922, Augusta, Maine: Maine State Archives Source: Maine Birth Records, 1621-1922
 
12019 Town and City Clerks of Massachusetts, Massachusetts Vital and Town Records, Provo, UT: Holbrook Research Institute (Jay and Delene Holbrook) Source: Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988
 
12020 Social Security Administration, Social Security Death Index, Master File, : Social Security Administration Source: Social Security Death Index
 

      «Prev «1 ... 237 238 239 240 241